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Wild Weekly Photo Challenge: Movement / Travel Theme: Dance / Sunday Post: Travel Attraction

“Movement has power to stir the senses and emotion.”

Doris Humphrey

ON THE MOVE
ON THE MOVE

This week, I’ve combined three challenges: the Let’s Be Wild challenge  “Movement”, Ailsa’s Travel Theme: “Dance” and Jake’s Sunday Post: “Travel Attraction” (Welcome back Jake!).  I’ve chosen to address them with a favorite series from our safari in Botswana.  We were fortunate to see a herd of impala on the run through Botswana’s marshes – demonstrating the speed, grace and agility of these beautiful creatures.

“Always seeing something, never seeing nothing.  Being a photographer.”

Walter De Mulder

LEAP
LEAP

“On with the dance, let joy be unconfined.

George Gordon, Lord Byron

In the never-ending fight for survival on the open plains, the impala’s speed is its major defense mechanism.  It also confuses its predators with group leaping – a behavior seen in these photos.  For me, the graceful movements of the impala as they spring through the water and grasses recalls the grand jete of a ballerina as she dances through the air.  And most certainly, the wildlife of Africa are one of life’s greatest travel attractions!

MAD DASH
MAD DASH

“Nature is so powerful, so strong…a dance with light and the weather.”

Annie Leibovitz

Impala have been clocked at sustained speeds of 37 mph, with bursts of up to 50 mph.  They can leap distances up to 32 feet.  Only the males have horns, which are used during mating season to challenge rivals in the quest for a mate.

SOLITARY STROLL
SOLITARY STROLL

“Those move easiest who’ve learned to dance.”

Alexander Pope

Sadly, we saw several examples of impala who were not quite fast enough providing a meal for some of the other magnificent species of Africa.  But if Africa teaches you nothing else, it is the importance of survival of the fittest (or in this case, the fastest) and the circle of life.

SAD ENDING
SAD ENDING
SAD ENDING II
SAD ENDING II

“Survival is the main objective.”

David Millar

Not wanting to end on a sad note, I will leave you with two favorite shots of the gentle and beautiful impala.  Here’s looking at YOU kid!

CATCHING A LIFT
CATCHING A LIFT
BIG-EYED BEAUTY
BIG-EYED BEAUTY

“Nature gives to every time and season some beauties of its own.”

Charles Dickens

For more entries in the Travel Theme “Dance” challenge, look here.  For more of Jake’s Sunday Post, look here.
I’m participating in LetsBeWild.com’s Wild Weekly Photo Challenge. This week’s Challenge is: Movement!

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69 thoughts on “Wild Weekly Photo Challenge: Movement / Travel Theme: Dance / Sunday Post: Travel Attraction Leave a comment

    • Thanks JP – some were not thrilled with the harsh realities but they are what they are, and are offset by the beauty. appreciate your visit and comment!

  1. Oh my goodness! What graceful movements from the gazelle and the water, scary one for the lion. I like the bird clinging on the gazelle too. Fabulous photos, Tina.

    • I know Anne, me too. Thought twice about including it but it really is a way of life there. The life of the hunters is a very difficult one too.

      Sent from my iPad

    • Thanks Madhu. I started out just doing the movement shots but got carried away because they are so special 🙂

      Sent from my iPad

    • Thank you Angel. I agree, they are really sad. But in Africa we learned so much about the animals and how hard it is for them to hunt and capture food. And even when they do, other animals are stronger and will steal what they’ve killed. After a while you learn to admire both the hunters and the hunted.

      • Survival is the first instinct for them I guess. It’s great that you’re able to observe them like that and one of my wish list is Africa. To see nature at its best. 🙂

  2. Beautiful shots, Tina. I particularly like that last one, the way he’s looking back. Solitary Stroll is also a great shot. The places you’ve been are amazing…with such amazing wildlife and scenery, and Botswana is no exception.

  3. Wow, so I’m thinking – then how fast can a Cheetah run – Googled and it said 70 – 75 mph. That is truly incredible!

      • My old art teacher who has retired rich (not as an artist) goes to Africa every year to take pictures of wild animals, and like you, held a few exhibitions, just for fun. He is a Parisian, living in Paris and Canton (also for fun). If your exhibition happens to be nearby (I live in SF), please let me know.

      • How lucky for him/her!! Paris and Canton-not a bad combo :-). I’m an east coaster but visit friends in SF often, it’s a beautiful city.

        Sent from my iPad

  4. What a powerful and beautiful post …. The brutal reality, but that is also so full of beauty.
    You have really captured it so fantastically. On the move … is my favorite.

  5. bursts of up to 50 mph and leap distances up to 32 feet– that is impressive. Magnificent shots of the movements! Love, love the last one. Thank you so much, Tina!

  6. OMG….these are INCREDIBLE!!!! LOVE ‘on the move’ & ‘mad dash’
    just fabulous!!what a GREAT eye!!

  7. Oh wow! As usual you amaze me with your beautiful photography Tina. Absolutely stunning shots hon. Thanks for sharing. 🙂

  8. Magnificent! You not only caught the beauty of the animals, but the water movement,etc. Saving us buckets of $$$$$$ sharing your wondrous travel photography!

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