The Great Unknown(s)

“Nobody sees the person holding the camera.”

Erica O’Rourke

BEACH SILHOUETTES

BEACH SILHOUETTES

This week Erica asks us to explore anonymity – what do we see when our subjects’ faces are hidden. Like Erica, I enjoy working to show meaning even when facial expressions are unseen. In my opening capture, for example, the family members’ hand holding expressed their genuine affection for each other. I shot them in silhouette because it was more about the togetherness of the family unit than the individual members.  

FIREFIGHTERS ON THE RUN

FIREFIGHTERS ON THE RUN

“We don’t need a cloak to become invisible.”

J.K. Rowling

I created the capture above from a moving car as we were driving by firefighters running to fight a wildfire raging nearby. I loved the motion apparent in their hat flaps, and the unity of purpose shown by the single rope each of them held as they hurried by in a single file. To me the capture speaks to a sense of urgency and purpose as well as incredible teamwork.

BOY WITH A HAT

BOY WITH A HAT

“Artists see the invisible before anyone else.”

Donna Goddard

The “boy with a hat” photograph above is one of my personal favorites. To me it captures a sense of the burden he carries, both literally and figuratively. Is his head down because of the weight of the sack on his back, or perhaps because there is so little for him to look forward to? In either case, as a  photographer it was to me a moment that demanded preservation.

BABIES AT PLAY

BABIES AT PLAY

“To be invisible, you need to be visible.”

Anthony T. Hincks

OK, I’ll admit it. I included my final capture above because these babies are just too adorable NOT to be included! They are the grandson and granddaughter of two good friends who honored me with a request to do a photo shoot of their family. I was reminded of the old commercial line “When EF Hutton talks, people listen.” Do you suppose it was a stock tip being shared, or more likely a suggestion on how to sneak down to the ocean when no one was looking?! 😀

 

I particularly enjoyed this week’s “Face in A Crowd” challenge and hope you did too.  

Note: For today’s post I’ve chosen to further increase the anonymity of the subjects through the use of impressionism in post-processing. For those who are interested, here are the original captures.


 

 

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78 thoughts on “The Great Unknown(s)

  1. Thanks for sharing the originals, I always enjoy getting an idea of the starting point when it comes to editing. You have done a nice job responding to the challenge. Of this set, beach silhouettes is my favorite, it’s a nice shot and I love the color in it.
    Cheers, Amy

  2. Gorgeous images, Tina, so well captured from cherubic baby faces to heroic racing firefighters! I like to use post editing myself when publishing faces, especially of children, or people who haven’t given permission to use their likeness. What is the editing program you use again? I meant to write it down last time you featured it. Thanks!

    • That’s very funny Judy–I hadn’t thought of it that way! This is a family that really enjoys each others’ company and while, like most people, their “millennials” are phone-dependent, they do put them down when they gather as a group 😀

  3. just an amazimg comparison Tina…..the firefights shot especially stands out…as u mentioned ‘an urgency’ feeling….gorgeous !!

  4. Lovely series of photos as usual, Tina. You got very creative with anonymous vs not-so-anonymous there. Any face is a face in the crowd and we all have some sort of purpose and matter to someone. Really like the wispiness of the original firefigher shot – men on a mission. Did you get family to post for you at the beach. Such a meaingful shot, walking together hand in and in towards light and the darkness to come 🙂

  5. Tina, those are such terrific images, either painted or straight, I can’t tell which one is my favorite, they all present the moment as you have seen it. Though I prefer the straight images a bit more, but maybe because I am an old school photographer. Thank you for sharing your beautiful work.

    • Many thanks Cornelia. I do love impressionist art so enjoy playing with images this way, but I’d call it purist bs old-fashioned—and you are surely not alone in preferring the original images! Feedback much appreciated

  6. Tina–your photos are, to me, in a class by themselves. Superb, always. I am intrigued by the firefighter photo. From a moving car, no less–it’s wonderful. But, oh, the cheeks on that little one–he is some kind of cute!

  7. Your capture of this topic is beautiful. Like others, my favorite is the firefighters too. I love the original, which is really close to the edited version. There is something about the way that particular photo speaks to me, it says so much without really knowing anything about who each person is. The team dedication and belonging of the group speaks volumes. Fabulous photos! Thanks for sharing your point of view.

    • Thanks Sally. It’s personal preference for sure. I have just always loved impressionist works so those appeal to me personally. Most of my followers as well as my husband do seem to prefer the originals. As always, the eye of the beholder is key

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  8. Pingback: WPC: Anonymity Known | Lillie-Put

  9. Thank for showing the faces of these babies,Tina. They are indeed adorable chubby cheeks. My favorite is the firefighters. They are the unsung hero, saving lives without recognition and incognito. Perpetua

  10. I really like the originals, Tina, but I also loved the edits. The second one is my favorite and it was interesting to see that it started out more like the edit than any of the others. Happy Friday!

    janet

    • thanks Janet – yes the firefighter shot was a very lucky capture. It’s not often I’m in the car with camera in hand. I think I was expecting to shoot photos of the fire itself, which I did, but the firefighters were much more interesting!

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