Weekly Photo Challenge – (Final) Reward

“The final reward of the dead – to die no more.”

Friedrich Nietzsche

(7 Photos)

SPOILS OF WAR

SPOILS OF WAR

Last week I participated in an interesting photo shoot at Magnolia Cemetery here in Charleston with local AP professional Alice Keeney. I’ve chosen to highlight some of my thoughts and favorite captures of a day spent among those who have gone to their “final reward”.  Although some may find my response to Krista’s “Reward” challenge a bit somber, for the believers among us,  perhaps not.  As an aside, try as I might I could not find the origin of the phrase. Can anyone out there in the blogosphere lend a hand on that?

LOCAL RESIDENTS

HITHER AND YON

“Being a Humanist means trying to behave decently without expectation of rewards or punishment after you are dead.”

Kurt Vonnegut

For a cemetery, Magnolia is remarkably full of life. There are magnificent old Live Oak trees throughout, as well as beautiful marsh views and lovely ponds and lagoons covered by charming bridges and paths. Birds are everywhere, including the two pictured above. We noted egrets, herons, seagulls, robins and several other species enjoying the beautiful sunny day – seemingly oblivious to the gravestones around them. The atmosphere was more like a bucolic walk through an inner city park than that of a cemetery. Magnolia is a well-known haunt (pun intended) for many of our area’s best photographers, some of whom were also visiting the same day.

THROUGH THE MOSS

THROUGH THE MOSS

“If people are good only because they fear punishment, and hope for reward, then we are a sorry lot indeed.”

Albert Einstein

Founded in 1849 at the site of a former rice plantation along the banks of the Cooper River, the cemetery is teeming with history. It is the final resting place of over 2,000 Confederate soldiers and 7 of their generals. There are also numerous notables, including former governors, senators and mayors, as well as 14 known signers of the Declaration of Secession – a critical document in the evolution of the Civil War. Finally, it is the resting place for all of the crew members of the famous, ill-fated Hunley – the first submarine ever used in warfare which was found in Charleston Harbor and excavated in the year 2000. My favorite story of the excavation was the confirmation of an oft-told story of the crew’s captain, Lt. George Dixon. A $20 coin was supposedly given to him by his sweetheart and was said to have saved his life by stopping a Union bullet. After surviving for 150 years, the story was proven true when the coin was found on Dixon’s remains with the inscription “My Life Preserver”. How cool is that?!

HEART OF MY HEART

HEART OF MY HEART

“No eternal reward will forgive us now for wasting the dawn.”

Jim Morrison

Beyond its history, the cemetery is a masterpiece of architecture and landscaping. Several of the original buildings remain, including the plantation ‘s manor home which now serves as the office, and the “receiving tomb” currently being funded for restoration.  Many of the graves include beautiful statuary, and examples of master ironworkers’ skills, once plentiful in our area, abound.

IN THE SHADOWS

FOREVER IN SHADOW

“Wisdom is the reward for surviving our own stupidity.”

Brian Rathbone

Behind it all, of course, there is evidence of great sadness. The only true death mask in the cemetery is that of young Rosalie White (pictured below), who died at the age of 8 months in 1882. So too, the gravestones of the young boys buried alongside one another in the confederate section of the cemetery – perhaps killed by a friend or even a brother in that horrific conflict.

FOREVER IN MEMORY

FOREVER IN STONE

“Lost, yesterday, somewhere between sunrise and sunset, two golden hours, each set with sixty diamond minutes. No reward is offered for they are gone forever.”

Horace Mann

Perhaps my favorite moment toward the end of our morning of shooting came as I happened upon this bottle sitting on a stone wall overlooking the marsh. It looked quite old, as if it had been there for a very long time. I assume someone had placed it there originally, but how long ago I wonder? How many have seen it and left it in its place, including yours truly? To me, it serves as a simple reminder that even among death, there is always life.

LIFE

LIFE

“Understanding is the reward of faith. Therefore, seek not to understand that you may believe, but believe that you may understand.”

Augustine of Hippo

Reward yourself with the efforts of some other bloggers here.

Birds, Birds, Birds – Weekly Photo Challenge: Rule of Thirds

“We see the world through rule of thirds, and many shades of grey
The search to get the perfect shot, continues every day.”

Dean Thorpe

(10 Photos)

AFRICAN JACKASS PENGUIN

AFRICAN JACKASS PENGUIN

This week I am reaching deep into the archives for a post I’ve wanted to do for some time about the extraordinary birds of Africa. Our challenge, the “Rule of Thirds” is an easy one for anyone who has studied photography. While, as we all know, rules are made to be broken, this is one that photographers follow in most cases. In the shot above, our little jackass penguin is perched nicely on the right side of the shot as he enjoys a brief nap in the warm sunshine. His position in the shot allows him “room to move” in the direction he faces. He also gives us a nice illustration of “bokeh”, the creamy out-of-focus background described by Jen in her challenge this week. By the way, his name comes from his donkey-like braying, not his personality.  😊

HAPPY HAMERKOP

HAPPY HAMERKOP

“Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.”

Pablo Picasso

The hamerkop, this time positioned on the left with room to move to the right, is named for the shape of his head, which resembles (supposedly) a hammer. He illustrates another aspect of photography – as always, it’s all about the light – in this case just after African daybreak.  One thing about an African safari – the animals and birds are out and about in the very early morning and late afternoon hours, which demands a very early wake-up call for those who hope to capture the many elusive species in their natural environment. This, of course, took me out of my own natural environment but in the case of a safari, the rewards definitely outweighed the annoyance of the wake-up call.

LOVELY LITTLE LILAC

LOVELY LITTLE LILAC

“Any fool can make a rule. And any fool will mind it.”

Henry David Thoreau

The beautifully colored Lilac Breasted Roller, also shown in this week’s header photo, is the national bird of Botswana and was fairly plentiful as we explored their beautiful countryside. As they pronounced the bird’s name the locals rolled the r’s making it sound as lovely as it looks. In this case, the foliage on the right side of the shot gave me what I felt was enough visual interest to place the subject a bit closer to the center of the shot while still allowing the bird room to move in the direction of his glance.

CONFUSED CRESTED BARBET

CONFUSED CRESTED BARBET

“The hell with the rules. If it sounds right, then it is.”  

Eddie Van Halen

This is a shot I’ve shared before, of another very colorful African species, the Crested Barbet. I’m repeating myself because he offers such a nice example of the rule of thirds as well as the use of a creamy bokeh to set him apart from the background. Don’t you just love the way he is permanently “bibbed” to be sure his meals of insects and and fruits don’t ruin his lovely red and yellow chest?!

GORGEOUS GUINEAFOWL

GORGEOUS GUINEAFOWL

“You are remembered for the rules you break.”

Douglas MacArthur

The guineafowl, another shot I’ve included in the past, is an example of how “not-to”. I remember vividly trying to race after this fast-moving fellow while he was surrounded by the beautifully colored flowers at the botanical gardens of Cape Town. I did my best but he was a bit too quick for me (they are known for their excellent running ability!) and I was only able to catch him on the very right side of the shot. Do you see how crowded he feels as he moves out of the photo with no room to maneuver? Still, I thought his incredible blue head surrounded by the colorful blooms made the shot worthy of a place in my favorites file.

STATELY SECRETARY

STATELY SECRETARY

“The golden rule is that there are no golden rules.”

George Bernard Shaw

The gorgeous Secretary Bird is a large bird of prey thought to be named for the distinctive black quill-like feathers in the back of his head. Here I’ve purposely broken the rule of thirds, as the stately appearance of the bird seemed to demand a prominent place near the center of the shot. Tell me this one doesn’t look proud of it’s beautiful coloring and plumage.

BANANA BIRD

BANANA BIRD

“Rules are a great way to get ideas. All you have to do is break them.”

Jack Foster

Somewhat less gorgeous, this yellow-billed hornbill is affectionately known as the Banana Bird to the local population. Jimmy Durante has nothing on him (OK, the youngsters among you can just look him up in Wikipedia!). He and others of his species were plentiful, and most often posed high in the trees. This shot of the banana bird on the ground, I thought, gave the best detail of his speckled coat and furry legs – oh yeah, and his big yellow beak 😊.

BIG BIRD(S)

BIG BIRD(S)

“Nature provides exceptions to every rule.”

Margaret Fuller

I’ve seen many an ostrich in captivity, but it was really exciting to see this pair in the wild. I loved the way they were looking at each other – knowing that while males will mate with several females, each does have a primary female to serve as his partner. Apparently ostrich females are a bit more lenient than their humans counterparts. They are also the fastest of birds so I was lucky to catch them moving at a fairly leisurely pace.

EAGLE-EYED

EAGLE-EYED

“Know the rules well, so you can break them effectively.”

Dalai Lama XIV

The stately African Fish Eagle is massive, with a wingspan of up to 8 feet. As his name implies, he feeds primarily on fish, but is also known to poach the eggs of other birds and to eat small mammals or crocodiles as well.  In this shot the eagle is in his typical position for hunting prey – high in the trees overlooking a body of water. Both his appearance and his hunting behavior reminded me very much of the bald eagles who nest near our home here on Kiawah. Similarly, for those who survive their first year, both bald and fish eagles can live well into their twenties – quite long for a bird species.

PECKING OXPECKERS

PECKING OXPECKERS

“There are no rules. That is how art is born.”

Helen Frankenthaler

Finally, a bit of homage to the humble Oxpecker, aka the Tickbird. These little creatures were everywhere, offering a valuable, symbiotic service to most all of the animals in the jungle as they feast on the ticks, flies and maggots that would otherwise be an intolerable nuisance. I think we saw them on every species other than the big cats and elephants. I’m not sure which would be worse – being infested by fleas or being pecked constantly by birds. Somehow Dante missed that in his infamous Inferno 😊.

An African safari is, as I’ve said before, a photographer’s dream. As one is surrounded by the incredible animals in their natural environment, one realizes the masterpiece that our world really is. But once you begin to become part of the whole, you realize that there are more wonders to be seen, including the beautifully exotic birds – just a few of which I’ve shared today. To see what others chose to share this week, click here.

Symmetry in the Vineyards: Weekly Photo Challenge

 “Symmetry, elegance, and grace – the qualities you find always in what the true artist captures.”

Frank Herbert

( 5 Photos)

VOLUPTUOUS VINES

VOLUPTUOUS VINES

There are few examples of symmetry more obvious than the beauty of a vineyard in bloom. Combining man’s efforts to create order with nature’s bounty results in some of the loveliest landscapes anywhere. Cheri’s challenge this week has offered an opportunity to highlight some of my favorite captures from a summer visit to Pinot Noir country in the Willamette Valley of Oregon.

CHAIN GANG

CHAIN GANG

“Symmetry is an idea by which man has tried to comprehend and create order, beauty and perfection.”

Hermann Weyl

Those who know us are well aware of my husband’s love of fine wine. He finds elegance in the design of the bottle, the artistry of the label, the color and bouquet of the wine itself, and of course, most importantly, the taste of the vintner’s creation. Sadly for him, I am not nearly as enamored with the product of the winemaker’s efforts as I am with the beauty of the landscape from which it is extracted.

ROWS AND ROWS

ROWS AND ROWS

 “The mathematical sciences particularly exhibit order symmetry and limitations; and these are the greatest forms of the beautiful.”  

Aristotle

In the vineyard we find row after row of nearly-perfect symmetrical vines – whether in full bloom, newly planted, or recently harvested. One of the benefits of marriage to an oenophile is the opportunity to visit vineyards around the world. One of my fondest memories of our many travels is a remarkable hot-air balloon flight as the sun rose over the vineyards of Australia’s Yarra Valley. Of course, we laugh every time we talk about it, because of our rather abrupt landing in the middle of a farm full of very unhappy cows who were so frightened they probably refused to be milked for days afterwards!

PATH OF PLENTY

PATH OF PLENTY

 “A tree has both straight and crooked branches; the symmetry of the tree, however, is perfect.”

George Lamsa

When I recall visits to the vineyards of the Napa and Sonoma Valleys in California I always think of the amazing colors of the mustard flowers which grow inside the off-season vineyards. Each year, about 90 days after the first rains of autumn, mustard pushes through vineyard floor, filling the landscape with yellow gold.  The plants are used as a “cover crop” in vineyards to reduce erosion and improve the quality of the soil. Visits to the area offer delicious mustard and olive oil tastings in addition to their famous wine tours.

LINEAR

LINEAR

“Seeing all life in perfect symmetry. Perceiving each day with righteous clarity. Living each moment in purposed reality. Believing each day is the start of eternity.”

S. Tarr

We have visited vineyards in the foothills of the glorious Andes mountains of Argentina, in the beautiful landscapes of Provence, France, across Australia and New Zealand and of course in the western US. I have never been disappointed in the opportunities for photography, nor has my husband ever been disappointed in the availability of delicious wine varieties. We have both enjoyed sampling the amazing offerings of the local chefs who seem to pop up all around the vineyards, pairing their best offerings with those of the nearby vintners. When it comes to the symmetry of the vineyard, really – what’s not to love?!

To see the symmetrical shots of some other bloggers, click here.

Weekly Photo Challenge – SCALE; Travel Theme – DETAILS

“Life is like music on a scale, shifting up and down. When life is over, your song has been written.”

Peggy Toney Horton

(8 photos)

MASSIVE MUSHROOMS

MASSIVE MUSHROOMS

As many of you know, I was traveling last week – enjoying a lovely visit with family in Scottsdale,  along with a zillion other people who had arrived to see either the Super Bowl, or the Waste Management Golf Tournament, or both. Had we known it would be their busiest week of the year, we’d have chosen another time – but in hindsight it worked out perfectly. Fortunately, Michelle has provided a nice opportunity to share some of my favorite photos from the trip with her challenge for the week “Scale”, and Ailsa’s Travel Theme “Details” fits nicely as well.  Above, I’ve captured a set of rock sculptures, aptly named “The Mushrooms” . While difficult to illustrate in a photo, the boulders were massive, and well-guarded by the prickly bushes surrounding them.

DESERT BLOOMS

DESERT BLOOMS

“From the landscape, a sense of scale.”

Richard Siken

At the other end of the size spectrum, although I’ve never seen it in full flower, the desert is surprisingly colorful even during its dormant season. Hues of yellow, green, and even blue are sprinkled throughout – thanks not only to the occasional blooming plant but also to the many types of lichen finding sustenance among the rock formations. From massive boulders to the tiniest details, the desert’s vast landscape has it all.

DESERT BLOOM II

DESERT BLOOM II

“Man knows that the world is not made on a human scale; and he wishes that it were.”

Andre Mairaux

I could not post about the Arizona desert without including at least one iconic Saguaro cactus. Long a symbol of the US West, this impressive plant can grow up to 60 feet tall and live for up to 150 years. I chose this specimen because of its many “arms”, although it falls quite short of the record cactus, which has 50! The arms are used by the plant to store water, making them quite heavy; an adult saguaro can weigh as much as 8 tons.

OCTI-CACTI

OCTI-CACTI

“The world is magical. Magic is simply what’s off our human scale… at the moment.”

Vera Nazarian

Speaking of details, cacti are of course famous for their thorns and we avoided many of them this time around, having learned how painful they can be on our last trip! See exhibits A and B below.

STICKERS

STICKERS

“Prosperity is no just scale; adversity is the only balance to weigh friends.”

Plutarch

DON'T TOUCH !

DON’T TOUCH !

“Words cannot convey the scale of a view that is so stunning it is felt.”

Eleanor Catton

We were certainly not alone in our enjoyment of the beautiful desert sun. In addition to many other hikers, we saw several bikers (yep, I thought they were crazy too!) pedaling furiously to climb the steep  hills. And although we didn’t see anyone on horseback, we did see evidence of their presence.

HOOFPRINTS

HOOFPRINTS

“Everything around us is scale dependent. It’s woven into the fabric of the universe.”

Geoffrey West

I’ll leave you with one final shot from our desert adventure. Although again the scale is difficult to judge because it was unapproachable, this rock formation was my husband’s favorite. It was visible from many points throughout our hike, and somehow always seemed to be smiling encouragingly to help us along our way….or was it perhaps a grimace?  You be the judge!

PUT ON A HAPPY FACE

PUT ON A HAPPY FACE

“If you don’t scale the mountain, you can’t view the plain.”

Chinese Proverb

Can’t get enough of me? Click here to see my guest blog about Glacier National Park on Dwellable.com. Afterwards,  check out some other bloggers’ takes on the weekly challenge here, and lots of “details” on Ailsa’s site here.

WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE: DEPTH

“We make our world significant by the courage of our questions and the depth of our answers.”

Carl Sagan

LORD LOVE A DUCK

LORD LOVE A DUCK

This week Ben’s challenge “depth” made me think of this capture of a very contented duck paddling atop a school of carp at the next level down – peaceful coexistence at its best! The clarity of the lake water was lovely, and belied its depth, which greater than you’d think. My polarizing filter was a must-have for this one 😊.

PARADISE FOUND

PARADISE FOUND

“Learn this from water; loud splashes the brook but the ocean depths are calm.

Gautama Buddha

Speaking of depth, how deep do you suppose this beautifully clear azure pool might be beneath the torrents of falling water?  Since it was pouring rain when I shot it, my umbrella was more important than any filter might have been.

I’m traveling this week with limited technology access, so will leave you with just these two shotst to consider. If you’re thirsting for some deeper interpretations, click here.

Why Not Charleston?

“Cities were always like people, showing their varying personalities to the traveler….Only through travel can we know where we belong or not, where we are loved and where we are rejected.”  

Roman Payne

NIGHTLIGHTS, CHARLESTON

NIGHTLIGHTS, CHARLESTON

There are some amazing places in this world, many of which I’ve seen and loved, some still on my bucket list. When considering great cities, places like New York, San Francisco, Paris, Rome, Vienna, Buenos Aires, Bangkok, Beijing, Shanghai, Hong Kong……well those and many more come to mind. Having been to and loved all of them, I am compelled to add just one more – my humble home city of Charleston, South Carolina.

SWEETGRASS ART

SWEETGRASS ART

“The city does not tell its past, but contains it like the lines of a hand.”

Italo Calvino

Asked by Accor Hotels to participate in their Three Things I Love About My Favorite City competition, I thought about all of the places I’ve been and the amazing people and sites I’ve seen along the way. At the end of it all, I found myself still in love with my adopted home city, Charleston SC.  What is it about Charleston that keeps me enthralled after 15 years? My challenge is not to come up with three things, rather it is to narrow my long list down to only three!

First, I suppose I would have to mention Charleston’s place in HISTORY.

SKYLINE VIEW

CHARLESTON, THE HOLY CITY

“The city buildings in the distance are holding up the sky, it seems.”

Markus Zusak

Although Europeans and Asians would laugh at our view of history, in fact as US cities go, Charleston has quite a place of honor. We are the home of the first shot of the American Civil War, which at 750,000 deaths is still the deadliest US war. North fought South and brothers fought brothers, nearly tearing our country in two. One of the contributing issues was a radically different belief in the right to own slaves. As a major port city during those times, many Africans were first delivered via slave markets in Charleston. Today, the Gullah culture remains as a strong reminder of those African roots, carefully preserved by the descendents of those early slaves. The sweetgrass basket pictured previously is one of many traditional art forms which can be seen throughout the city. In addition, Charleston (known as the Holy City) is home to over 100 churches specifically because of her religious tolerance during a time when such freedom was hard to find. The city was an early home to Hugenots and Jews among others, fleeing persecution in their countries of birth. Many of their houses of worship remain today.

ON THE WATER

ON THE WATER

“A city is more than a place in space, it is a drama in time.”

Patrick Geddes

Next, I would point to LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION. Charleston is situated along the eastern seaboard of the southern US, on a peninsula formed by the Ashley and Cooper Rivers. Although our summers can be extremely hot and humid, ocean breezes provide relief from the worst of them. Tropical flowers like jessamine and oleander add color and fragrance to the air, and stately live oak trees with hanging Spanish moss shade many of our cobblestone streets. Graceful egrets and herons are plentiful year round, and friendly river dolphin are frequently seen meandering along our shores. Shrimping takes place from November through May, providing a delicious fresh catch to our many wonderful restaurants – contributing to Charleston’s reputation as a mecca among foodies nationwide.

THREE LIVE OAKS

THREE LIVE OAKS

“A city is not adorned by external things, but by the virtue of those who dwell in it.”

Epictetus

Finally, and most importantly, I submit there is no city anywhere more charming than Charleston. Yes, SOUTHERN HOSPITALITY is real, and very much alive here in Charleston. Our little city of roughly 125,000 people has received so many awards they are difficult to count. Among them, Friendliest City in the US, Top City in the US and Canada, Top Travel Destination in the World, Best Place to Retire – the list goes on and on. Why so many awards for a relatively inconsequential city? For so many reasons, but chief among them, I believe, the residents and their incredible southern charm. Here, the people smile and say hello as you walk down the street, they say please and thank you, they welcome you into their homes and businesses, they assume the best and cause you to deliver it back. I submit a small example from my personal experience.  When I first moved to Charleston I was on my way to a large, sold out performance at a major downtown facility. When I realized I’d left my tickets at home and didn’t have time to retrieve them and still make the performance, I called the venue. I was told it would be no problem, simply report to the ticket counter upon arrival, show them my drivers license and they would show me to my seat. Try THAT in any of the other cities on the list and let me know how it goes!

CITY HALL, CHARLESTON

CITY HALL, CHARLESTON

 “A city is not an accident but the result of coherent visions and aims.”

Leon Krier
I love Charleston for so many reasons, her history, location and her people tops among them. A lively jazz scene, great restaurants, historic plantations, thriving colleges, charming antique shops and wonderful medical care are a few of the others. One early evening stroll along Charleston’s Battery, warm breezes blowing the scent of jasmine as dolphins swim along the river beside the antebellum mansions might convince you to love her too. With thanks to Accor Hotels for their invitation, I submit Charleston, South Carolina as My Favorite City – Why Not?!

Weekly Photo Challenge: Express Yourself

“I quote others only in order the better to express myself.”

Michael de Montaigne

(8  photos)

SHINY SHOES

SHINY SHOES

This week Krista has challenged us to demonstrate self expression. For a photographer every photograph is, to some degree, an expression of self. After all, each capture offers the photographer’s perspective on the subject at hand. Beyond that though, as I considered the challenge, I found myself thinking about the ways each of us finds to express our uniqueness.

BOOT-I-LICIOUS

BOOT-I-LICIOUS

“The goal of art is the vital expression of self. ”

Alfred Stieglitz

The way we dress, for example, says a great deal about us. One might think the wearer of the shoes in my opening capture might be a bit different than the wearer above – although you never know what a horsewoman might wear when stricken by the mood to dress up 😊 .

LOTSA HATS

LOTSA HATS

 “Beauty without expression is boring.”  

Ralph Waldo Emerson

You’ve heard the expression “from head to toe” right?  So what about hats? Surely they are a means of expressing who we are and what might be our mood on a given day. A hat with a certain style does more than protect us from the sun. It’s also a sure way to set oneself apart from the crowd, don’t you think?

HOT PINK

HOT PINK

“Creation which cannot express itself becomes madness.”

Anais Nin

On a more serious note, we find many ways to express our individuality; the arts for example. Even the youngest among us are fascinated by music’s ability to communicate our thoughts and moods.

BABY AND BONGOS

BABY AND BONGOS

“Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent.”
Victor Hugo
Music is a passion that can remain with us throughout our lives. I recently read a report on Alzheimer’s which said that music is one of very few things patients are able to remember as other memories disappear. Who can forget the image of Glen Campbell, deep in the throes of the disease, playing his guitar as beautifully as he did at the height of his career?
MERRY MUSICIAN

SAXMAN

“After silence, that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music.”

Aldous Huxley

Painting, drawing, writing, music, photography – each is a way for an individual to express him or herself without a spoken word. Used therapeutically, the arts can give abused children a means of communicating their pain – often a first step toward recovery.  Many who suffer from neurological issues like Autism have shown amazing talent for art – again offering a tool for self-expression when words are inadequate.

SKETCH ARTIST

YOUNG SKETCH ARTIST

“It is the supreme art of the teacher to awaken joy in creative expression and knowledge.”

Albert Einstein

According to the American Art Therapy Association, patients’ and clients’  artwork helps them to “explore feelings, reconcile emotional conflicts, foster self-awareness, manage behavior and addictions, develop social skills, improve reality orientation, reduce anxiety, and increase self-esteem“.  I’d say that’s a pretty powerful set of tools for self-expression, wouldn’t you?

HAND OF AN ARTIST

THE ARTIST’S HAND

“Live life as though nobody is watching, and express yourself as though everyone is listening.”

Nelson Mandela

I chose Nelson Mandela’s thoughts to close my post because it seems to me that if everyone followed his advice, ours would be a much better world. How might you act, and what might you say (or not say) if heeding his counsel?

To see how some other bloggers have expressed themselves, click here.